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Tim Klein loves jigsaw puzzles – but not just to solve them. He gets creative with them:

Jigsaw puzzle companies tend to use the same cut patterns for multiple puzzles. This makes the pieces interchangeable, and I sometimes find that I can combine portions from two or more puzzles to make a surreal picture that the publisher never imagined.

The results can be fascinating. I particularly love this “T’rainosaurus Rex” ;-)

Click the image to go to Tim Klein’s portfolio

Thanks for pointing this site out, BoingBoing!

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Past Sunday saw us ride our annual Autumn Motorcycle Trip – us being a dozen like-minded bikers of different walks of life. Usually we plan this trip in October, to hopefully enjoy the last summer-like days of the year. But we had to change our plans this year, and the weather forecasts weren’t too great. It is November, after all.

But somehow the ten of us managed to ride the whole trip with just a few drips of rain, not enough to don our rain gear. Better: we even had a few minutes of nice sunshine, right in the middle of the Dutchess Hedwigepolder (sorry, in dutch only) in the Netherlands.

Yellow is the best colour for a motorcycle in this autumn sun!

We went there for a last visit – on a bike – to a part of the Schelde estuary that will soon be returned to the river and the Northsea, in order to diminish the risks of floods further up the river. Combined with the “Verdronken Land van Saeftinghe” the Hedwige and Prosper polders will be converted to a single natural reserve. Perhaps I will be able to go there on a bird-watching safari in a few years?

TorrentFreak explains why and how a “Swedish ISP Protests ‘Site Blocking’ by Blocking Rightsholders Website Too“.

“Bahnhof has repeatedly demonstrated how copyright law is being abused and exploited by greedy opportunists [like Elsevier], and in the end it is always ordinary people who have to pay,” Bahnhof notes.

Thank you, Bahnhof, for speaking out against the abuse.

This is what you’ll see when surfing to Elsevier’s site as a Bahnhof customer. Don’t you love that modem sound?

The fight against copyright abuse: that’s exactly what Aaron Schwartz was a part of, and the case in Sweden, like others (check Australian law, for example), proves that the battles aren’t over. In fact, that is why the EU really needs to get rid of the current proposal for a Copyright Directive, and come up with something much better.

In the mean time, let Cory Doctorow explain why it is good that “Europe’s massive plan to require open access for all science gets two new backers: Wellcome Trust and the Gates Foundation“:

Now, Europe’s two largest science funders have joined the consortium: The Wellcome Trust and the Gates Foundation, and with these 15 funders backing Plan S, nearly all science research in Europe will be open access.

“Open Access” to scientific publications, that’s what this is all about.

November 8 is the birthday of Aaron Schwartz, who died in 2013. Calling Aaron a hacker is neither nice nor correct – he was a programmer, an entrepreneur, a fighter against internet censorship, and more.

Lisa Rein and the Internet Archive are organising the sixth Aaron Schwartz Day during the coming weekend. If I lived in San Francisco, I would try to attend at least part of this event.

Click the image to go to the EFF for more info about Aaron and the ASD

Thanks to the EFF for making me remember Aaron.

Speaking of sustainable energy: as is well-known, toy company Lego has already broken its ties with oil company Shell a few years ago. Now Lego is experimenting with ways to produce its famous bricks from non-petroleum-based oil. The first parts are for sale now: the trees in its Vestas Wind Turbine are produced from sugar cane.

The wind turbine itself looks impressive enough on paper/screen, and having a set that’s about 1 meter high will certainly be impressive in real life as well. It is, however, too bad that this wind turbine requires electricity to run, and is not capable of producing electricity when positioned in the wind…

The weather of the past week was not very sunny in Belgium: lots of clouds and grey skies, a bit of rain, and even a few rather cold nights and days. All in all, however, the month of October gave us lots of sunshine. So much sunshine, in fact, that it turns out to be the sunniest October in 8 years! At least that what our solar panels tell us, and if we may correlate “hours of sunshine” with “solar energy production” ;-)

That also means that our panels have already produced more than 2 MWh this year, and there are still two (dark) months to go. All in all, 2018 will be a good year in terms of solar energy. The current situation of the nuclear electricity production facilities in Belgium isn’t too reassuring: only one of the seven reactors is currently online – you can see the vapour from its cooling tower in the picture below. Too bad we still do not have a good large-scale way to store solar electricity for use in the winter…

Looking into the direction of the
nuclear electricity production facilities of Doel (B)…

This time I am the one who’s a bit late with the announcement of the update… But the good news is that Belgian Samsung Galaxy S7 devices can now upgrade their machine to the October 1 security patch level with the latest G930FXXS3ERJ1 update.