Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Linux’ Category

Just so I don’t forget it myself: I’m using Grive2 to backup a few hundred files to Google Drive from the little Asus portable. Why? Because I finally took the time to automate the daily readout of our solar panels on that little Linux machine, and I don’t want to lose that information (one little file every day!) should anything happen to the portable.

I found the instructions on how to install and use Grive2 here: “How to sync your Google Cloud on Linux with Grive2“. Basic stuff, easy to execute: ideal for an eternal beginner like myself ;-)

I had to change the crontab entry, because the line in the example wasn’t working for me. I replaced the ‘grive -path /home/wouter/somedirectory‘ part of the crontab entry with ‘cd /home/wouter/somedirectory && grive‘. And that did the trick.

There are other solutions, of course, but this was sufficient for me, at least for now.

PS. Yes, I really should replace that machine with a Raspberry Pi… but that will have to wait until later.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

It’s something I need to remember: how do I install an old PyUSB package on Xubuntu (or a similar Debian-based OS). Why, you ask? Because I need that old version 0.4.3 for the little script that reads the solar energy numbers from the SMA Sunny Beam.

Image of the SMA Sunny Beam monitor for our solar panel installation

The SMA Sunny Beam monitor for our solar panel installation

Luckily, it isn’t too hard to do. This is my context:

Step one is to make sure you have the required header files to compile the PyUSB package. So you open up a terminal session and execute

sudo apt-get install libusb-dev
sudo apt-get install python-dev

Step two: Extract the root folder and all the files from the PyUSB archive, and make that folder your current directory in the terminal session.

Step three: compile and install the package with this command:

sudo python setup.py install

That’s it. When all goes well, you’ll be able to verify the existence of two new files on your system, in a directory called “/usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages“:

usb.so
pyusb-0.4.3.egg-info

Done!

Read Full Post »

Short Operating System News

I’m sorry to read that Cyanogen will stop its work on the renowned alternative to Google’s Android. I like CyanogenMod a lot, as evidenced by my writings on the subject. We’ll have to wait and see if LineageOS can replace it.

The good news: Pixel OS for Raspberry Pi. I should really get one… but then again: there are already too many computers on my desk!

Read Full Post »

A few weeks ago I had trouble with some of the sd-cards in my camera’s. Taking pictures was not the problem, but the cards would not show up in the Finder or on the Desktop of my Mac Mini. Having no clue as to why those cards remained invisible, I booted my preferred alternative: Xubuntu.

Again, the cards did not show their contents, but at least Xubuntu told me what was going on: “unknown filesystem type 'exfat'“. The cards were formatted in exFAT – I suppose the Fuji X20 did that. A quick search instructed me on what to do, and a few minutes later I could see (and backup) my photos. So for those of you who found themselves in the same situation, here’s “How to Mount and Use an exFAT Drive on Linux“. Easy and very useful!

Trying out my new smartphone ;-)

Trying out my new smartphone ;-)

Since then, somehow that same sd-card is now handled like any other on the Mac. Did the Mini need the latest MacOS update, or was it just the reboot that did the trick? I’ll never know, but I did learn again that Xubuntu (or Linux in general) is more than just a toy for IT geeks – it can be very useful. But you all knew that, no?

Read Full Post »

For my own comfort I am documenting this little (but essential) tidbit on my blog: How to “Remove Old Kernels In Ubuntu With One Command“. It’s a post from 2010, but it should work, according to the comments. I will admit, however, that I handled my current problem using the (manual) instructions I found on “Ask Ubuntu”.

Here's what I saw

Here’s what I saw (with a larger number)

I have been updating my system regularly, as it should, since the initial installation. Using the manual instructions mentioned, I managed to delete all 4.2 kernels and more.

Admittedly, I also issued these commands:

> sudo apt-get clean

and

> sudo apt autoremove

Yes, that last one uses ‘apt and not ‘apt-get‘ – that’s how it was spelled somewhere, and it cleaned up a lot of stuff! I’m not sure if it’s best or safest way to make sure you’re only running the latest installed kernel, though. I know Linux is for geeks <grin />, but I can’t help agreeing with one of the commenters on the post mentioned: “There’s no excuse Ubuntu doesn’t do some kind of automatic cleanup…“, or at least does so with a single, simple command or tool.

Read Full Post »

As predicted in my previous post, I installed the Ice application from the Peppermint Linux distribution on my Xubuntu PC. Although is part of the PeppermintOS distribution, installation in Xubuntu (and presumably Ubuntu as well) is quite simple. I followed the instructions from the Ubuntu Forums thread “How to get a program called “ice” from Peppermint OS 6“. In a nutshell (make that a real shell in your Terminal, please):

cd ~/Downloads
wget https://launchpad.net/~peppermintos/+archive/ubuntu/p6-release/+files/ice_5.0.1_all.deb
sudo dpkg -i ice_5.0.1_all.deb

For good measure, you should check the latest Peppermint OS release packages to make sure you have the latest stable edition of Ice – just replace ‘ice_5.0.1_all.deb‘ with the name of the latest version.

The link to my PVOutput.org site works OK in Xubuntu. But you must remember that all Ice-generated applications use the same cookies etc. as the Chromium browser they are based on. That may not be 100% what you need, but I haven’t yet found a solution for that problem (other than writing your own application).

Read Full Post »

A long time ago, say in 2011, I must have figured this out already: to boot an Asus EeePC from a USB memory stick or an SDCard, you have to proceed as follows:

Ignore the BIOS boot order, the boot menu overrides it temporarily, unless you want to boot from a USB stick every time it boots, changing it in the BIOS is not necessary. Just try it, instead of hitting F2 to go into the BIOS, hit Esc.

Every EeePC I’ve ever come across has the boot menu when you hit Esc, it is the easiest way to boot from a USB stick or SD card.

Start hitting the Esc key as soon as the machine boots: simple, and it works like a charm! Thanks, elliott678 !

Xubuntu_Logo.png

It has taken many hours installing and testing different Linux distributions, but I think I have found the successor to ElementaryOS and Ubuntu on my two old PC’s. Xubuntu turns out to be the most fluent Linux on the old 1MB PC, and that means it will be good enough for the EeePC as well, I guess. I will probably install different versions on both of them: 14.04 LTS is good enough for the PC. On the EeePC I tend to experiment a bit more, and since it has double the memory a more recent version should offer more opportunities to familiarise me with the specifics of the X-variant of Ubuntu… That could well be my first new year’s resolution: learning Xubuntu!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »