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Archive for the ‘Design and Art’ Category

If I had an Apple Watch, I absolutely would need to have this charging stand!

Image of the Elago Vintage W3 Apple Watch Stand

The Elago Vintage W3 Apple Watch Stand

Thanks for pointing this out, BoingBoing (Clever Apple Watch stand that looks like an Apple Macintosh) !

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Why was I reading Byte Magazine in those days ? Because my Serbo-Croatian language skills amount to exactly zero. But these computer magazine covers from the 1980’s and 1990’s are certainly worth a look, if only for nostalgia’s sake. Just have a look at this example from September 1987.

Cover of Racunari, September 1987

Click on the image to see more “Yugoslavian Computer Magazine Cover Girls of the 1980s-90s

See that Sinclair Spectrum on the girls lap? See the mention of the BBC Archimedes, which launched in 1987 – I could not afford one at the time… Anyway, a few (actually, many!) of the other covers are a lot “racier”, if you understand my meaning – and I’m not talking about the speed of the microprocessors.

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Mozart Rocks! Or at least this portrait does! (thank you, BoingBoing).

Mozart is clearly at home in these modern times ;-)

Mozart is clearly at home in these modern times ;-)

The reason for this celebration? “Giant 200-CD ‘Mozart 225’ Box Set is a Surprisingly Hot Seller“, 225 years after Mozart died. I’m a big fan of Mozart’s music, but I will not buy a single box with all  his compositions. I want to make my own choices. Mozart may have been a musical genius, but that does not mean I have to like every single note he wrote.

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Just as in February 2014 and November 2014, I had the privilege of a guided tour at the Belfius Art Gallery yesterday evening. The current exhibition, called “Recollection – Art & Fashion“, focuses on the relationship between art and fashion. It combines 17th century paintings with contemporary clothes, shows paintings by a fashion designer, next to one of his designs, and more. Everything “packaged” in a setting that combines lots of textile in various forms with video loops.

Click the photo to see the rest of my impressions on Flickr

Click the photo to see the rest of my impressions on Flickr

I won’t try to answer the question: “Is fashion an art form?“. But the the exhibition makes it abundantly clear that art inspires fashion, and that fashion inspires artists. The way all the works are presented on the 32nd floor of the Rogier Tower in Brussels made it a worthwhile visit – recommended!

If you want to visit the Gallery, hop over to the Belfius Art Gallery website and reserve your spot – the gallery is only open for the public by reservation on a limited number of dates from now until April 2017.

By the way, if you visit this post after April 2017, don’t try the Gallery link. Belfius apparently has not yet found a way to archive its past exhibitions, as I have just found out while revisiting my 2014 posts on the subject…

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I have started a fixed place to gather a few essential bookmarks about Australian Aboriginal art, because our trip there in 2015 made quite an impression on us. Nothing fancy, just bookmarks that I know are worth a visit if you care about the subject.

"Emu Dreaming" by Narelle Nakamarra Nelson

“Emu Dreaming” by Narelle Nakamarra Nelson

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Yes, that’s how Julldozer describes his digital sundial: he uses “programmable pixels inside a shadow” to make the sundial “print” the time on a flat surface. This is the result (there’s more of this in a time-lapse video on his website):

The Mojoptics Digital Sundial in use

The Mojoptics Digital Sundial in use

In a video Julldozer explains the science behind this remarkable object. The complexity of the sundial object is reduced, according to Julldozer, by using an open-source tool called OpenSCAD to program the design instead of designing it manually. And then all you need is a 3D printer and lots of time… Or you can presumably buy one in his gift shop.

All in all, I like this contraption. It’s an ingenious build, and it’s a nice display of what 3D printers are capable of.

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If you like “ASCII art”, then you probably already know that this phenomenon started a long time before computers and daisywheel printers. The article “The Typewriter ASCII Portraits of Classic Hollywood and the Obsessive Fans Who Made Them” on the Pictorial website explains it all, and shows a fine selection of samples from the 1920’s.

"Harold Lloyd, a type sketch done by Katherine H.Parsons"

“Harold Lloyd, a type sketch done by Katherine H.Parsons”

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