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Archive for the ‘Design and Art’ Category

Yes, that is how one of the comments on TechSpot describes the machine built by Daniel de Bruin. Mashable calls it the Googol Visualizer Machine, and that is what it is:

… the first gear needs to make one googol rotations just to turn the last gear one complete rotation.

Click the picture to see it running on YouTube

A googol is a 1 followed by a hundred zeroes in the decimal system – go read the Wikipedia for a explanation. That will also explain where Larry and Sergei got the name for the most famous search engine on the Internet ;-)

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“Seeing” things as colors or sounds has always intrigued me, so I had to have a look at the “What Color Is Your Name?” website. Don’t expect an extensive and scientific explanation of the phenomenon; just enjoy the results. Here’s what the alphabet look s like for Bernadette:

I can see this site being used to select a color scheme by website designers!

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In the words of David Pescovitz (BoingBoing): “In memory of Monty Python co-founder Terry Jones, who died this week, please enjoy “Monty Python and the Holy Grail in LEGO.”

I couldn’t agree more.

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Stefan Rohrer is a German sculptor, whose name I never would have known were it not for the picture that accompanied the announcement “Bikes und Blumen” (“Motorcycles and Flowers”) on the Motorrad website:

A sculpture called “Schwalbe 2007” by Stefan Rohrer- Photo by Thomas Schmieder (Click on the image to see the large version)

I suppose scooters fascinated him greatly in 2007, because he did something similar with a Vespa scooter as well:

A sculpture called “Vespa 2007” by Stefan Rohrer (Click on the image to see a larger version)

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I don’t think the word “caketrope” is in the English dictionary, except Pee-wee’s, of course. But the cake he points to is truly magnificent:

Click the image to visit Alexandre Dubosc’s site for more food art!

Click the image to visit Alexandre Dubosc’s site for more food art!

Alexandre Dubosc must be a patient man, in order to create the art he shows off on Youtube.

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My first camera was an Olympus OM-1, and I still regret parting with it when the children became so active that I needed an autofocus camera to catch them on film ;-)

I still remember the build quality of the OM-1, and I loved the fact that the OM-1 plus a 50mm and 135mm lens (plus a bit of small junk) fitted in a small bag that could barely contain the Nikon F-something from my best friend. Olympus takes a top spot in my list of reputable firms, that should be no surprise.

In October, Olympus will celebrate its 100 years of existence, and they have created a website to show the history of the company and some of its products. It includes a nice video documentary about the evolution of the Olympus camera business.

Olympus: “A Great Moment” (click the image to see the video)

There’s a brief history of the company logo as well; that’s where I found the name ‘Tokiwa’.

(via DPReview)

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This is not a placeholder post. But it may look like one, since it will (or at least may) be different for each visitor. I’m using the Picsum Lorem website to add a more or less random image to this page.

Click the image to go the Picsum Lorum home page

Picsum Lorem takes a well-known concept: the use of placeholder text when designing a document, and applies it to images. The images are free, coming from the Unsplash community. For details about what Unsplash means with “free” you should check out their Help pages. In summary and according to my interpretation, “free” does mean “free” as in “free beer”, but it is considered a basic form of politeness if you credit the photographer of an image when you use it in a commercial context. Sounds logical, no?

I guess it won’t be long before we also find a “Moviesum Lorem” – or perhaps we should call it “Vidsum Lorem” ;-)

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