Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Software’ Category

Yesterday, Samsung pushed an OTA software update to my Galaxy S7. I’m not in a position to tell you exactly which modifications were applied – it certainly was not Android 7.1. Samsung offered no details on screen, so I can only rely on what I can glean from the current status of the device. My conclusion: I suppose that the 214MB update mostly consisted of security enhancements…

Here’s what the “Software information” screen has to say:

Software Information about the latest S7 update in Belgium

Read Full Post »

As it turns out, Nikon had to release a second firmware update for the Nikon D5600, in order to correct the troublesome connectivity of  SnapBridge. In their own words, firmware 1.0.2 will provide “Improved pairing and connectivity between the camera and Android versions of the SnapBridge app“. I don’t use SnapBridge that often, but making a connection between devices should be simple, and certainly simpler than what I had to do 4 months ago.

Indeed: downloading the Android app on my smartphone and connecting both devices took just few clicks on both sides. I hope it goes fluidly for you too!

Read Full Post »

I have used the Signal – Private Messenger app for a long time – I even remember that it was originally called ‘TextSecure’.

Luckily for me, the app also includes support for ‘normal’ (unsecure!) SMS messages, because only a very limited number of friends and acquaintances were willing to follow me. Perhaps this news will change their minds:

Without any fanfare, the Senate Sergeant at Arms recently told Senate staffers that Signal, widely considered by security researchers and experts to be the most secure encrypted messaging app, has been approved for use.

Source: ZDNet

So the US Senate is allowed to use this app – will the Open Whisper Systems crew be proud and see this as a compliment?

Read Full Post »

Of course I’m going to try this out: “Huzzah, Visual Studio for Mac is now available to all“!

Click the image to see more details about the product

Click the image to see more details about the product

Read Full Post »

I’m very happy with my Galaxy S7, thank you. But given all the talk about the new kid in town, the Galaxy S8, I took the time to read Ars Technica’s review of Samsung’s new top phone. The S8 looks like a nice piece of kit, even when the fingerprint reader clearly isn’t ideally positioned – that could be a deal breaker now that I am used to unlocking a phone and tablets with just a finger.

I strongly agree with Ron Amadeo when it comes to Samsung and operating system updates:

Historically, Samsung is very bad at delivering major OS updates for its flagship device, and that looks to continue with the Galaxy S8. The latest OS version, Android 7.1 has been out for six months, but it hasn’t made it to the Galaxy S8.

It’s best to look past Samsung flagships for an idea of what future support will be like. Samsung only released Android 7.0 Nougat for the Galaxy S7 in January 2017—five months after the initial release—and we’re only referring to the very earliest unlocked models of that device. Updating the full Galaxy S7 line across carriers was a multi-month process that didn’t finish until March.

A process that didn’t finish until March? Well, here in Belgium that process still has to start, let alone finish! Since several months, I wait for a sign from Samsung that I can upgrade my S7 to Android 7. An update to Android 7.1 is even further away, it seems…

April 27th, 2017 – 23:00 EST

I know that the Sammobile website has lots of firmware downloads available, including some for the S7. But the Belgian version is explicitly destined for the models sold by a major carrier, and mine is unlocked, so I’m not (yet) risking that version ;-)

Read Full Post »

Archive.org is publishing a series a programs, that allows any Mac-aficionado to return to 1991 and play around with old software on a modern computer. All you need is a browser, and – like me – you’ll be playing Crystal Quest again. The only drawback: I had a Mac IIsi in those days – with a colour display, and Crystal Quest comes up in a monochrome version…

And don’t worry if you do not like Crystal Quest: the site contains already a nice collection of programs, including games.

Read Full Post »

It has been a long time since I needed one, and it turned out that I did no longer have one available (installed) on my current machine: a hex editor. But there is ample choice on the web. I tried two of them: first Hex Fiend, from ridiculous_fish. You wouldn’t tell from looking at the homepage of the site, but the author(s?) has written serious code – and explanations about them to boot. Hex Fiend works well, and can supposedly handle very big files. That could come in handy.

My second test concerned 0xED, a tool (the only one?) by Suavetech. It has a somewhat different user interface, probably because it is a bit older. It works quite well too. Like Hex Fiend, it displays selected bytes in different interpretations, but it has more of them. As an extra, you can even write your own plugins to display your selection – that might come in handy if your dealing with somewhat more exotic data than text or numbers.

0xED examining its own download file

For the moment, I’ll leave 0xED on my disk.

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »