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Archive for the ‘Apple & Macintosh’ Category

Yesterday I discovered a failing WD MyBook; here’s what I did to replace it.

  1. I dumped the old MyBook enclosure;
  2. Since I still had a working Sitecom “no screws needed” enclosure for 3.5″ disks, I decided to use that rather than a new one. I just bought a new hard disk (a Seagate 1 TB if you must know – cheap, but good enough for a 10 year old iMac);
  3. I also bought a Sitecom “Hard Drive Docking Station” that offers 2 drive bays and a “clone a disk” function;
  4. Using the docking station, I cloned the original disk from the MyBook, which still had all the Time Machine backups from the iMac. This took a few hours, but other than putting in the disks and pushing a button for three seconds it was effortless on my behalf;
  5. Then I put the new HD into the enclosure, connected it to the iMac…

… and presto: the iMac recognised the disk, Time Machine got to work, and… nothing – things are back as they should be. Simple, heh?

The Sitecom docking station with the old HD in it

I can still use the old hard disk – or any other disk, for that matter – as an occasional external disk using the docking station. Even though I have just used it once, I like the docking station for its simplicity: it worked straight out of the box. The instructions take up only a single page of a little booklet. As someone wrote in an online review of the thing: ‘the only thing missing, is an “eject” button, that might save you from pulling out a disk while it is still in use by your computer‘. Well, if that’s the only weakness…

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We’re using a WesternDigital MyBook Studio to make TimeMachine backups of the family iMac in the living room. We bought this device around 2010, if memory serves me well. So when I noticed that it wouldn’t start up anymore, I immediately thought: how can I replace the disk with a newer one? After all these years, a hard disk failure is the most probable cause of trouble, no?

The enclosure of these MyBooks isn’t easy to open, but there’s at least one video on Youtube that explains the procedure:

Click to see the video on Youtube

While it’s not the exact same model as ours, it turns out that the enclosure is nearly (or even perfectly) identical. So I owe BenoniStudio many thanks for helping me. Be warned that you will inflict pain to your fingers while trying to find the right angle to pry the enclosure open!

Thinking I was ready to call it a victory, I replaced the original hard disk with another WD HD from my “stock”. The result, unfortunately, wasn’t what I expected: the new hard drive (which I knew to be OK) wouldn’t come up either. And a quick test with another hard disk enclosure confirmed that the original hard disk from the MyBook was still OK (or at least readable) – and that means it is the MyBook controller that fails.

Conclusion: I need at least a new hard disk enclosure. And perhaps it is even better to get a new hard disk as well – 500GB is no longer top of the bill… So perhaps a new MyBook – if they’re still called that – is the best solution. The old enclosure is ready to be dumped, that’s for sure.

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Rich Stevens has a point in his “Comic: Classic Mac Meltdown“.

Click to see the full comic.

But let’s face it: most of the old Macs are nice collector items, but not much use for actual daily use on the Web these days!

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I do not want to pretend to fully understand the exact nature of the so-called KRACK Attack vulnerability in many implementations of the WPA2 protocol that is supposed to make WiFi network connections secure. All details about the KRACK Attack can be found on the webpages of the (Belgian) researcher that found the issue.

I do worry about the fact that MacOS and Android are both mentioned as being particularly vulnerable to this issue. On October 31, 2017, Apple released updates for MacOS EL Capitan, Sierra and High Sierra to solve the problem (at least, that’s how I interpret their report on the subject).

Samsung, however, hasn’t published any updates to their Android version for my Galaxy S7 since August 1st. Perhaps there is no problem on the SGS7? Or is Samsung just being lazy – after all, my phone is still running Android 7.0 – no word on 7.1, let alone 8.0…

And how about all those other devices, IoT and others, that use WiFi connections? Have you already updated your router? How about the wireless hard disk vaults that photographers use? Or the photo cameras themselves? Etcetera.

Matters such as this will need to resolved on a large scale before I will put my trust in the “Internet of Things”, no matter the type of connection used to talk to each other.

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There’s not much to say about such a little application, and yet I know that I will use it often: tyke.app. It’s just a little addition to your menu bar, and there’s no need for a manual ;-)
Just download the DMG file proposed, open it and drag the app to your Applications folder. And if you like it, just add it to the “Login items” of your account in the Preferences.

A propos the subject of open source: this app makes me question my desire to see the source of any application. On one hand, I would love to see the source code for this project, because it’s a great example of a simple application that is very useful, contrary to the eternal HelloWorld app. On the other hand, publishing the source code makes it very likely that someone(s) will start tinkering with the code, adding stuff that detracts from its real functionality and thus diminish its value – and that is not good.

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A while ago my iPad played up, forcing me to reinstall it through iTunes. Since I do not keep much data on the device itself, this wasn’t much of a problem, except for the time lost with a bit of tinkering and figuring out how to do it correctly – it was the first time I had to resort to this measure.

In the course of the procedure I was asked to enter my “iCloud Security Code“. I take great care to register all my passwords, as I explained in “Minding your own password business“. But my files showed no knowledge of such a code. Strange: could I have forgotten to write it down?

Searching on the Internet helped to clarify things. Matthew Green is a well-known cryptographer, and his article titled “Is Apple’s Cloud Key Vault a crypto backdoor?” not only tells you that the iCloud security Code is (usually) identical to you iPad passcode. It is, in fact, a rather comprehensive yet clear overview of how Apple handles your passcodes and crypto keys in the iCloud Keychain. Good reading material for when you have a clear mind ;-)

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Of course I’m going to try this out: “Huzzah, Visual Studio for Mac is now available to all“!

Click the image to see more details about the product

Click the image to see more details about the product

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