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Of course I endorse the “Contract for the Web” – head over to https://contractfortheweb.org/ to do the same!

As mentioned earlier, my ‘Grive2’ solution stopped working around November 25, and that is still true today. I have copied the daily updates by hand for a few days, but that is not a permanent solution.

That left me no choice: I needed to find another tool to replace ‘Grive2’. Luckily I had already been experimenting with ‘Jdrivesync‘ somewhere in 2018. The scripts I created at the time should still have worked today (I had kept everything in place), but a first attempt failed with an unclear exception message about OAuth.

Just to be thorough I checked the app access settings on my Google account. I found no sign of ‘Grive2’, just mention of an ‘Ubuntu’ app. So I thought: let’s get rid of that and try again. But that didn’t improve the situation. Strange, because in theory ‘Jdrivesync’ was now supposed to ask for a new authorisation key, and it did not do so.

Looking in my home directory on the Xubuntu I quickly found the culprit: the file .jdrivesync does contain the accessToken and refreshToken required by Google/OAuth. Deleting the file finally did what I wanted: Jdrivesync requested a new authorisation code and ran as it is supposed to do. Nice, although I should point out that Google again complained about not having verified Jdrivesync and did I really want to continue whit that app? Of course I do!

Now I just have to adapt crontab ;-)

PS. I will also keep an eye on the ‘google-drive-ocamlfuse‘ project. That would allow me to mount the Google Drive file system on the Xubuntu machine, giving me an opportunity to learn how to use rsync… But that’s for another time!

In “The State of the Octoverse ” for 2019 Github writes:

And for the first time, Python outranked Java as the second most popular language on GitHub by repository contributors.

Not bad – JavaScript takes first place, Python and Java follow.

Talking about Python allows me to announce that I hacked my first Python application ;-)

You see, I’m still running an old version of Trac to track issues and document my developments. Old means: version 0.10.5, and the problem is that I don’t have the time at this moment to upgrade to the latest version. So when I had to move to a brand-new Windows 2016 server I just took the existing installation instructions and got Trac running fine, although not under the wings of IIS. Except for one thing: the new server was behind a firewall and a virtual IP address (VIP), the latter also taking care of HTTPS to HTTP conversion. So when my browser sends an HTTPS request, Trac sees HTTP traffic and responds with HTTP redirects when replying to certain actions. Those replies turn into error pages in the browser, since HTTP traffic from the browser does not pass the firewall and is not intercepted by the VIP…

I have been reading up on Python, but I can’t say I have developed anything seriously in it. Python is however sufficiently readable so that I easily found my way in the code. To solve my problem, I just had to force Trac to always redirect to HTTPS URLs. As far as I can tell, I had to change but a single line of code to make that happen. Here’s the code of the ‘_reconstruct_url’ function after my hack:

Image of the Python code for the function '_reconstruct_url'

I changed lines 226-227 to the single statement in line 228

I’m calling this a hack because it only solves my problem; this is not something you want to submit to a public repo. It also means that the application no longer responds to standard HTTP requests. But it’s good enough for now.

From what I have seen on the Trac website there are solutions for running later versions of Trac over SSL, but most (all?) of them seem to rely on an SSL front on the same server as Trac. Too bad that such a solution won’t work for me. Guess I’ll have to study Python and Trac a lot deeper to find the best way to cope with the architecture at work.

I can’t help it: when I see a BMW R1100S for sale online, I have to check out the pictures and the specs. These days, a user called Julien is selling this Randy Mamola edition of the R1100S. It cannot be denied: the bike is looking fine after about 15 years on the road. It’s a bit too flashy for me – I don’t go racing every weekend, or ever.

A BMW R1100S in a nice and sunny setting

Nice bike, nice picture!

Will it fetch the asking price of 6000€ ? No idea. Will its new owner like it? Sure hope so!

Contrary to what happened in the previous months, our solar panels delivered 112% of the average photovoltaic electricity in November months for our system. November 2019 will thus help us reach yet another year with over 2MWh – even a dark December should deliver enough to make that possible (at least, that’s what I hope).

 

I have been using Grive2 for a couple of years, to help me get the numbers from our photovoltaic panels into Google Drive storage. That has been going very well… until today.

The new or updated files from my panels did not show up today, although they had been created correctly on the EeePC. When I tried the Grive2 synchronisation by hand, the tool reported a 401 error: access not allowed. I suspected an issue with the Apps authorisation for the Google account concerned, so I deleted the existing ‘grive’ App and launched a new registration request. Alas, to no avail; this is what Google had to say:

Why, oh why, Google?

All I can say is: come on, Google! This has been working fine for a couple of years – why cut it off now? If you really had to cut off access, why not alert the its users first? And what is “temporarily”: a day? a week? forever?

I will copy the files by hand for a few days, but that solution won’t last long. After all, we automate processes so we don’t have to remember doing them, the more so when the process is tedious. Copying files by hand is tedious, and error-prone too…

This (my!) Macbook Pro from 2012 is still in a fine condition, and very usable, e.g. to maintain this blog. It may be 7 years old, but is by no means too old to be productive. I have no trouble keeping it up to date, at least until now: it is running Mac OS Catalina.
About window of the Macbook Pro

Since I took the screenshot Catalina has been updated to version 10.15.1.