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Archive for November 15th, 2019

A few days ago I tried to use KeePassium on the iPhone. Yet another KeePass app, you say? Yes – because it pays to be open to change, and in this case because KeePassium promises to sync automatically with any of a list of cloud storage providers. That promise means you can not just use DropBox, but also Google Drive, iCloud Drive, Synology NAS, and more, to store your file(s). It’s nice to have more choices when it comes to safely storing your passwords.

My current KeePass app, MiniKeePass, requires an explicit manual “Save to…” and “Open in MiniKeePass” actions to keep your cloud copy in sync on multiple devices. I tend to forget those “Save“s and “Open“s now that a iPhone is my daily phone; on my Galaxy S7, Keepass2Android requires just a “Sync” to figure whether to save its local copy to the cloud or to get the cloud version if that is more recent (and vice-versa, of course).

So I downloaded KeePassium, and pointed it to a copy of my .kdbx file. Unfortunately, the app wouldn’t / couldn’t open it, although it claims to compatible with all versions of KeePass files. Strange – or perhaps a bad copy on my side? I don’t know, since the error message wasn’t very clear. This means I will stick with MiniKeePass for the time being, knowing that I will have to look out for another KeePass-compatible app soon…

Why should I replace MiniKeePass? To begin with, the MiniKeePass app is no longer actively maintained, going by the updates to the source code on Github: the latest updates are from late 2017. And it shows: in iOS 13 I can see a few mix-ups in the user interface. For example, look at this:

Is MiniKeePass in Serious Trouble?

It’s not the only KeePass-compatible iOS app that is getting (too?) old to be worthy of attention. Check out the list of ‘Unofficial KeePass Ports‘ and even a cursory glance at the majority of entries will turn out to be (very dated). One version even goes back to 2010 – that’s almost the prehistory in IT terms. Others are more recent but require payment to get rid of ads – without any guarantee that the app will work with my files.

Let me be clear: I don’t mind paying for an app, especially for an app that will guard the hundreds of passwords I have to store. But then I want an app with a better-than-just-good UI, since I will be using it every day; I want automatic syncing with a choice of cloud storage providers; I want serious support, at least in the form of regular and continuing updates to comply with Apple’s progress. And ideally the source code of that app should be audited by independent security specialists, to make sure that it is indeed a secure and safe implementation, worthy of a user’s trust. I’ll keep looking! Your suggestions are most welcome, too.

 

Update on 2020-02-02: I revisited the app and changed my recommendation

 

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