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Archive for May, 2014

I have already mentioned that “old smartphones” still have value, and I commissioned my ZTE Blade (an Orange San Francisco, to be exact) to be the official Sonos controller device in our living room. To do so, I kept the CyanogenMod 7.1 version already on the machine – there’s no need to upgrade if you’re going to run just a single app, right?

This old Blade beats an expensive Sonos controller!

This old Blade beats an expensive Sonos controller!

For those of you who would like to try and run more recent versions of Android on one of the many variants of the ZTE Blade, have a look at the “ZTE Roms” blog. I haven’t tried to install any of the ROMs mentioned, but the links seem to point to the right documentation and downloads. It’s clear that there is a large choice available, but only if you know your Blade… Make sure to have a bit of time at hand, because it will take some experimentation to get KitKat running on your Blade (if at all!).

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The BBC shows how it’s done and writes a small part of history about a still image camera with a video camera: “One hundred years of Leica cameras“.

[…]  photojournalist Tom Stoddart, who works with a Leica camera, shares his thoughts on a number of classic photographs as well as the background behind his own favourite image.

The Napalm Girl, 1972 (by Nick Ut, Associated Press)

The Napalm Girl, 1972 (by Nick Ut, Associated Press)

Leica camera’s have witnessed and eternalised many ‘historical’ moments in those hundred years. Each of those images has its own story, even if it is not always written down. And here’s the story of an image that wasn’t made: “Forty years after ‘napalm girl’ picture, a photographer reflects on the moment that might have been his“.

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Late in 1999, I decided to understand how it was possible to edit a webpage using that same webpage. Don’t ask me why I chose to so at EditThisPage.com, because I can’t remember. I had been reading Scripting.com for some time; it must have been Dave Winer’s enthusiasm that persuaded me – that and the promise of a free account (which was quite exceptional in those days of slow dial-in connections and clumsy websites).

A few days ago, Brent Simmons told his version of “What Happened at UserLand“. Reading the story from Brent reminded me of how exciting those days were for me – you could say that those first months of writing in Frontier were the start of my fascination with content management (and content management software)!

Somehow, my “old” blog is still up and running, thanks to the generosity of people like Dave Winer and Jake Savin. Better yet, even the administration module of the site is still active – I have just corrected the link to Project Gutenberg (which was still pointing to their old http://promo.net/pg address).

My first blog post

My first blog post

Dave Winer, of course, picked up Brent’s story, and adds a few tidbits from his point of view. But what’s really interesting, is one of the comments on Dave’s post. Kudos to Rex Hammock, who writes:

He may have gotten some of the details wrong, but Brent has provided a great example of what we all need to do more — record our versions of things that we were a part of…or merely observed.

As our company is 23 years old and many of the employees have been with it most of that time, I’m constantly amazed to hear stories of things that everyone recalls in different ways. Some are stories I’ve never heard. Others are versions I find amusing or realize something that was negative to me was positive to someone else, or vice versa.

I remember once many years ago (thanks to google, I know it was in July of 2007) writing my personal version of the history of blogging. I think my intentions were to be funny, however, now that I look back, it works for me — at least, as my version.

My version of what life is about” – isn’t that the perfect definition of what a blog is? I know now what I did not realise in 1999: this blog is very much “me” and how I see things. Thanks again, Dave (and Brent, and Jake, and so many others), for making it possible for me to express myself on the Web!

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It is well known that Time Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau should both be credited with the “invention” of the Internet. Together they proposed to fund a project about interlinked documentation, which led to what we now know as the Internet, and Cailliau wrote the first web browser for the Mac, called MacWWW.

Robert Cailliau is the best known Belgian in the history of the Internet, but he is not the first one. In the late nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth century, several people were thinking about information storage and retrieval: Vannevar Bush, of course, but also people like Paul Otlet, Emanuel Goldberg, and even H.G.Wells. Paul Otlet, another Belgian citizen, turns out to have been quite visionary. ‘The Atlantic’ tells “The Secret History of Hypertext” and writes:

Otlet saw the network as essential to his vision of a worldwide platform for knowledge sharing; Bush envisioned the Memex as a stand-alone machine. For all his remarkable prescience, Bush never predicted anything like the Internet. That credit rightly goes to Otlet.

© Mundaneum, Centre d’archives (Belgium)

© Mundaneum, Centre d’archives (Belgium)

There are a lot of calls for “innovation” in the air in Belgium these days;. Based on what I have read, you could say that we haven’t done that bad in the past – we just have to keep up the good i-work today and in the future ;-)

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google-elections-belgium-2014.png

Actually, there are elections for the European Parliament all over the EU, but today there’s no Google Doodle for that, as far as I can tell.

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Yes, there is a way to speed up your Chrome browser on Android. All it takes is a little change to a ‘hidden’ setting, called chrome://flags/#max-tiles-for-interest-area. Just enter this URL in Chrome’s address line, choose a higher value, and then restart Chrome.

Chrome flags - Be cautious when experimenting!

Chrome flags – Be cautious when experimenting!

For reference: although Reddit user ‘erythrocytes64’ recommends a value of ‘512’, you may want to experiment a little. On my tablet (Samsung Galaxy Tab 2) , I found that ‘256’ made Chrome a lot faster than ‘512’ – at least subjectively.

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Unfortunately, the BBC must also report:

A committee set up to investigate the shooting said it was still looking for the person who ordered the operation.

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